Brown Dwarfs and their Big Siblings

My latest article is up at Sky & Telescope.  I discuss two recent studies suggest that brown dwarfs, or so-called “failed stars,” are nevertheless more like stars than planets.

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Artist Conception of a Brown Dwarf Atmosphere / NASA JPL

Brown dwarfs are the exceedingly common runts of the stellar litter. But even though they’re everywhere, their faint glow makes them difficult to observe and understand. Two recent studies shed light on the formation of these once-exotic objects.

First proposed as an idea in the 1960s and finally discovered in the 1990s, brown dwarfs bridge the gap between the smallest stars and the largest planets, never igniting hydrogen fusion in their cores. They cool off over time, slowly shedding the nascent heat leftover from their formation as a dim glow.

Read more here!

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